Our Alumni - Their Accomplishments     

Maryhelen Cleverly Harmon, Ph.D., American Literature, 1981 - She is an Associate Professor of English, University of South Florida where she specializes in 19th century British and American literature and is a winner of the Krevanek Award, USF's highest teaching award. Harmon has written book chapters and articles on the English Romantics, Hawthorne, and Melville.

 

David Bottoms, Ph.D. 1982 - Robert Penn Warren selected David Bottoms's first collection, Shooting Rats at the Bibb County Dump, for the 1979 Walt Whitman Award. His recent work includes Armored Hearts: Selected and New Poems and the novel Easter Weekend. He is a Professor of English at Georgia State University and the State Poet Laureate for Georgia.

 

Raoul G. Cantero, III, B.A. 1982 - Justice Cantero was appointed to the Florida Supreme Court on July 10, 2002, by Governor Jeb Bush. He is the first Hispanic to sit on the Court. Justice Cantero has lectured on various topics, including Florida appellate procedure, appellate writing, federal appellate jurisdiction, expert witnesses, jury voire dire, and federal civil procedure. He also has taught at Florida State University's College of Law. He is author of “Certifying Questions to the Florida Supreme Court: What's So Important?” 76 Fla. Bar. J. No. 5 (May 2002); “Changes to the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure,” 71 Fla. Bar J. No. 11 (Dec. 1997); “Discovery from Medical Experts: How Much is Too Much?”, 16 Trial Advocate Quarterly 1 (Winter 1997); “Non-Final Review of Insurance Coverage Issues: Wading through the Quagmire,” 69 Fla. Bar J. No. 9 (Oct. 1995); and co-author of “Controversy in the Competitive Bidding Process,” 68 Fla. Bar J. No. 9 (Oct. 1994). Justice Cantero is also an accomplished fiction writer, having published several short stories.

 

Heather Sellers, Ph.D. 1992 - Heather is the author of three volumes of poetry, Your Whole Life, Drinking Girls and Their Dresses,and The Boys I Borrow, a collection of stories, Georgia Underwater, which won a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers Award, and Two books for writers, Page After Page and Chapter After Chapter. Her textbook for the multi-genre creative writing clasroom, The Practice of Creative Writing from Bedford/St Martins is in its second edition. Sellers has been a member of the Hope College faculty since 1995, and is a full professor of English. Her memoir, You Don't Look Like Anyone I Know is out from Riverhead Books (Penguin) in October 2010. She's at work on a collection of essays.

 

Pamela Ball, MA 1988 - Pam Ball is haole, born and raised on Oahu of American parents. Both of her novels, i>Lava and The Floating City, are set in Hawaii. She is the winner of numerous writing awards, including the Hemingway Short Fiction Award.

 

Jesse Lee Kercheval, BA 1983 - Poet, essayist, short story writer, and novelist, Jesse Lee Kercheval is the author of seven books, including Dog Angel, The Museum of Happiness, Space: A Memoir, and Building Fiction: How to Develop Plot and Structure. She teaches at the University of Wisconsin where she directs the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing.

 

Masood Raja, Ph.D. 2006 - Masood joined the English Department of University of North Texas in the fall of 2010. He is the author of Once Upon A Country, a light satire about the leaders, politicians, and generals of a country called Khabistan. His book Constructing Pakistan (Oxford UP) addresses the previously neglected aspect of postcolonial and historical engagement with the creation and construction of Indian Muslim national identity before the partition of India in 1947 and traces the varied Muslim responses to the post 1857 British ascendancy. He has also recently published The Postnational Fantasy: Essays on Postcolonialism, Cosmopolitics and Science Fiction (McFarland 2011), which examines the relationship between the fantastic in novels, movies and video games and real-world debates about nationalism, globalization and cosmopolitanism. In the process, he successfully charts a new discursive space, where postcolonial theory, science fiction, and fantasy studies work cooperatively to expand our understanding of the fantastic, while simultaneously expanding the scope of postcolonial discussions.

 

Celia Kingsbury, Ph.D. 2000 - Celia is an Associate Professor of English at Central Missouri State University. She is the author of The Peculiar Sanity of War: Hysteria in the Literature of World War I which examines the impact of war hysteria on definitions of sanity and on standards of behavior during World War I and For Home and Country: World War I Propaganda on the Home Front.

 

Steve Watkins, Ph.D. 1990 - Steve Watkins is author of The Black O: Racism and Redemption in an American Corporate Empire (University of Georgia Press), which won the Virginia College Stores Award for Best Book by a Virginia author, and the story collection My Chaos Theory (Southern Methodist University Press). His stories and articles have appeared in dozens of publications, including North American Review, Quarterly West, The Nation, and The Pushcart Prize Anthology. He teaches journalism and creative writing at the University of Mary Washington.

 

Tom Hunley, Ph.D. 2003 - Tom is an assistant professor of English at Western Kentucky University and the director of Steel Toe Books (www.steeltoebooks.com). Since leaving FSU, he has had three poetry books published: The Tongue (Wind Publications 2004), Still, There's a Glimmer (WordTech Editions 2004), and My Life as a Minor Character (Pecan Grove Press 2005). His book of essays, Teaching Poetry Writing: A Five Canon Approach, forthcoming from Multilingual Matters LTD. 2007, has been excerpted in The Writer's Chronicle.

 

Rita Mae Reese, M.A. 2003 - Rita Mae Reese, after changing majors every semester, dropped out of college and went to work for a lesbian press. She’d worked there for nearly seven years when a visiting author convinced her to quit and go back to school full time. She then earned a BA in American Studies and an MA in Creative Writing at Florida State University and then an MFA at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Rita Mae has received a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, a Stegner fellowship, and a “Discovery”/The Nation award. Her work has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. She lives in Madison, Wisconsin with her family.

 

Russ Franklin, Ph.D. 2000 - Russ is a Wallace Stegner and a Truman Capote fellow in fiction at Stanford University. His short stories have appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Epoch, and Greensboro Review. He is a winner of the Quarterly West, novella competition. His short story "Night Flying" is anthologized in Air Fare: Stories, Poems and Essays on Flight.

 

Charlie Sweet, Ph.D. 1970 - Charlie Sweet, Ph.D., is a Foundation Professor of English and Theatre and Associate Director of the Teaching and Learning Center at Eastern Kentucky University. He has co-authored two books on pedagogy, It Works for Me! and It Works for Me, Too!, as well as a collection of mystery stories, Bloody Ground: Stories of Mystery and Intrigue from Kentucky and Private Eyes: A Writer's Guide to Private Investigating.

 

Kim Garcia, M.A. 1996 - Kim Garcia is the author of The Brighter House, winner of The White Pine Press Poetry Prize 2015, DRONE, winner of the 2015 Backwaters Prize, Tales of the Sisters, winner of the 2015 Sow's Ear Chapbook Contest, and Madonna Magdalene, released by Turning Point Books in 2006. Her poems have appeared in Crab Orchard Review, Crazyhorse, Mississippi Review, Nimrod and Subtropics, and her work has been featured on The Writer’s Almanac. Recipient of the 2014 Lynda Hull Memorial Prize, an AWP Intro Writing Award, a Hambidge Fellowship and an Oregon Individual Artist Grant, Garcia teaches creative writing at Boston College.

 

Stephen Graham Jones, Ph.D. 1998 - Stephen’s dissertation was his first novel, The Fast Red Road, followed by the books, All the Beautiful Sinners, The Bird is Gone, Bleed Into Me: A Book of Stories, Demon Theory and upcoming in 2008, the novel Ledfeather. His over ninety stories have appeared everywhere, from Writing Fiction to The Year's Best Fantasy & Horror. A past NEA Fellow, Texas Writers League Fellow, and winner of the Independent Publishers Award for Multicultural Fiction and the Texas Institute of Letters Award for Fiction, Stephen twice won a President's Book award when he was Associate Professor of English at Texas Tech University. He is currently a Professor of English at the University of Colorado-Boulder.