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Graduate Courses

AML 5017
Studies in US Literature to 1875: The US Literary Revolution of 1850-1855
John Mac Kilgore
WMS 324 jmkilgore@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 3:05-4:20 p.m.

Why was so much great US literature published between 1850 and 1855? That’s the question we will explore in this course. Over seventy years ago, F. O. Matthiessen coined the term the “American Renaissance” to describe the inventive outpouring of national literature in this half-decade—classics such as Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1850), Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851), Thoreau’s Walden (1854), and Whitman’s Leaves of Grass (1855). While scholars have long since opened up Matthiessen’s exclusively white, male club of “renaissance” writers to the brilliant literary production of women and people of color, it remains a curious fact that many of the most groundbreaking texts in today’s expanded canon were also published in the same half-decade. Reading a variety of works both popular and unknown, I will make the case that the 1850s represents not a renaissance but a cultural revolution whereby literature took up the mantle of imaginative protest, declaring literary independence against the consolidation of US Empire. We will work together to understand this broad literary revolution across US letters by considering the historical context, publishing world, political movements, and aesthetic forms/genre experimentation that situate this body of literature.

Likely Reading List:

  • Hannah Crafts, The Bondwoman’s Narrative (185?)
  • Sojourner Truth, Narrative of Sojourner Truth (1850) and “I Am a Woman’s Rights” (1851)
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Blithedale Romance (1852)
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852)
  • William Wells Brown, Clotel (1853)
  • Frederick Douglass, The Heroic Slave (1853) and My Bondage and My Freedom (1855)
  • Herman Melville, shorter works including “Bartleby, the Scrivener” (1853), The Encantadas (1854), and Benito Cereno (1855)
  • James M. Whitfield, America and Other Poems (1853)
  • Fanny Fern, Ruth Hall (1854)
  • John Rollin Ridge (Yellow Bird), The Life and Adventures of Joaquín Murieta (1854)
  • Maria Susanna Cummins, The Lamplighter (1854)
  • Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854)
  • Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Poems on Miscellaneous Subjects (1854)
  • Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass (1855)

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course in 1660-1900. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: American Literary and Cultural Studies to 1900; a Literary Genre (Fiction).

AML 5608
Envisioning the Future: Post-apocalypticism and the Black Female Imagination
M. L. Montgomery
WMS 433 mmontgomery@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 11:35 a.m.-12:50 p.m.

This course surveys representative works of speculative fiction and expressive culture by black women in an Afro-diasporic geography, including the United States and Anglo Caribbean. We will read and discuss novels by Octavia Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, and Nnedi Okorafor alongside texts by authors previously excluded from Afro-futurist canonical formations such as Jessmyn Ward, Edwidge Danticat, and Michelle Cliff. Notions of history, hybridity, liminality, and border-crossing will figure prominently in investigative undertaking as will ideas surrounding the role of queered bodies and their role in framing futuristic imaginaries. Our inquiry culminates with a discussion of Beyonce’s visual album Black is King as an instance of black women's intervention into science fiction, fantasy culture, and Afro-futurism.

Using the work of Mark Dery, George Lipsitz, Tricia Rose, Greg Tate, and Ytasha L. Womack as the discursive springboard for our discussion, this course enables a critique of mainstream science fiction's reliance upon tropes of whiteness, maleness, and heterosexual normativity. Ultimately, our investigation seeks to expand the scholarly conversation surrounding black fantasy culture in ways that take into account neglected contributions by women across the trans-Atlantic world.

Required Texts:

  • Jessmyn Ward, Salvage the Bones
  • Edwidge Danticat, Claire of the Sea Light
  • Octavia Butler, Fledgling
  • Toni Morrison, Tar Baby
  • Gloria Naylor, Mama Day
  • Nnedi Okorafor, Binti
  • Nalo Hopkinson, Brown Girl in the Ring
  • Michelle Cliff, Abeng
  • Beyonce, Lemonade

Recommended Readings:

  • Ytasha L. Womack, Afro-Futurism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture
  • George Lipsitz, Dangerous Crossroads: Popular Music, Postmodernism, and the Poetics of Place

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: African-American Literary and Cultural Studies; Colonial, Postcolonial, Transnational Literary and Cultural Studies; a Literary Genre (Fiction). This course also meets the Alterity requirement.

 

CRW 5130
Fiction Workshop
Elizabeth Stuckey-French
WMS 226 estuckey-french@fsu.edu
Tu, 1:20-4:20 p.m.

I believe strongly in discussing freshly minted student material in workshops. In my experience, the energy and exchange of ideas in such a group can motivate everyone who participates. Ideally, for this class, I’d like you to submit new work. However, if you do submit a pre-workshopped piece, make sure that you are really open to hearing our suggestions. I would prefer that you submit something rough and malleable rather than polished and fossilized.

Each student will have two-three stories workshopped by the entire class, twenty pages max per submission. If you want to submit a longer piece you can do it in separate sessions. In addition, each student will choose a published short story, essay or book chapter and do a presentation on it in class.

In this class we will explore some of the subtleties of the craft of fiction writing. What risks do successful fiction writers take and how can we learn from them? What new risks might you take in your own fiction? How can you make your fiction as dramatic, intense, engaging (and publishable) as possible? Our goal is the creation of a community of writers who can learn from and help each other. Courage, honesty and dedication are expected.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5130
Fiction Workshop
Skip Horack
WMS 438 shorack@fsu.edu
Th, 1:20-4:20 p.m.

CRW 5130 is a graduate workshop in fiction writing. This class will follow the workshop model, and therefore student work, and the intensive discussion of that work, will be our main focus. To that end, over the course of the semester students will be required to share at least three story-length manuscripts (one revision and two new pieces; novel excerpts are fine). This course assumes you have a very serious interest in fiction writing, as well as in discussing the writing of same with others likewise engaged. Our concerns are mainly practical and craft-based: where you as author wish to go with a particular draft, and how we, as readers and writers engaged in a common cause, might help you get there.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5130
Fiction Workshop
Russ Franklin
WMS 437 rfranklin@fsu.edu
W, 6:35-9:35 p.m.

In this course you will write fiction and workshop fiction. The course provides you with an audience for your stories or chapters from your novel.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5331
Poetry Workshop: From Thesis to Book
Virgil Suarez
WMS 452 vsuarez@fsu.edu
M/W, 6:35-7:50 p.m.

This workshop is not only going to focus on your best poems thus far, but it is also going to help you begin the thesis-making process, and beyond that get you to start preparing the foundation to your first book (or second book if you already have a first). We are going to spend a lot of time workshopping your poems beyond early revisions. Reinvention and re-envisioning are going to be a regular part of the process. You will be expected to write and rewrite a large portion of your work for this class. We are also expecting you to contribute a lot of time to critique and help your classmates with their work-in-progress as well. With any luck this will be a small group of participants who will benefit from this intensive workshop.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

CRW 5331
Poetry Workshop: The Ode: Poetry of Praise from Ancient Sumeria to the Present Moment
Barbara Hamby
WMS 419 bhamby@fsu.edu
W, 6:35-9:35 p.m.

In the craft element of this workshop (the first hour) will discuss the ode, which is often defined as a poem of praise on an elevated subject. It may have started out that way but was turned on its head by the Romantics and Walt Whitman and then turned again by Pablo Neruda. We’ll start the class with Sumerian odes translated from cuneiform texts, then move on to the Psalms and Song of Solomon, Pindar, Horace, Pindarmania in Renaissance England, the English Romantics, Whitman’s “Song of Myself,” Neruda’s Odas Elemenatles, and then twentieth- and twenty-first-century writers of odes, including Allen Tate, Robert Lowell, Frank O’Hara, Allen Ginsberg, Yusef Komuyakaa, Kenneth Koch, Sharon Olds, and poets writing odes today. I’m gathering new poems all the time.

The second part of the class (two hours) will be workshop in which we will read and discuss your original work. You do not have to write odes. I like to create a nurturing workshop in which we all work to make your poems as strong as possible. I also look for patterns in your work and your voice that will help you shape your MFA thesis or creative dissertation. We will have two conferences, one early in the semester and one later.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

ENC 5317
Article and Essay Workshop: Narrative Nonfiction
Diane Roberts
WMS 434 dkroberts@fsu.edu
W, 6:35-9:35 p.m.

In this workshop we will read nonfiction writers which may include Ta-Nehisi Coates, Virginia Woolf, Samantha Irby, James Baldwin, Helen Macdonald, Bob Shacochis, Rebecca Solnit, Hilton Als, William Hazlitt and other luminaries of the genre.

Students will produce 20-30 pages of prose: stand-alone essays, linked short pieces, or part of a larger work which might be memoir, personal essay, travel or nature writing, investigative work; nonfiction is a broad church. I would hope that some of you would try to publish, too. We will also discuss how to pitch editors and how to write a nonfiction book proposal.

Requirements: For MFA students, this course satisfies 3 of the required 12-15 hours of writing workshops. For PhD students, it counts toward the 27 hours of required coursework.

ENC 5735
Visual Rhetoric
Michael Neal
WMS 223C mrneal@fsu.edu
Tu, 1:20-4:20 p.m.

Visual Rhetoric introduces students to key texts, readings, and theories of visual rhetoric and visual culture. Visual messages are present in various media across a range of contexts: film, television, advertising, social media, architecture, design, etc. This course begins with the assumption that visual language is one of many available means of persuasion that neither displaces nor functions in isolation from other modes of communication. It also assumes that visuals are a relevant discourse within society that shape and are shaped by various individuals, collectives, and ideologies.

This course will begin by exploring several attempts to define and/or classify visual rhetoric and visual culture in order to get a sense of the depth and breadth of current scholarship as well as multi-disciplinary perspectives that influence our thinking about rhetoric in the visual. This will lead us to explore questions such as: What are the relationships between and among visual, oral, written, and digital rhetorics? What language is best situated for articulating visual rhetoric? How do different disciplines and professions read, make meaning from, and compose visual texts? What influences do screens, hypertexts, and multi-modality have on visual rhetoric?

Students in this course will be asked to read, critique, analyze, and produce a number of visual texts throughout the semester.

Requirements: This course fulfills a concentration requirement within the Rhetoric and Composition PhD program and a coursework requirement in the Rhetoric and Composition MA.

ENG 5028
Rhetorical Theory and Practice: Ideas of Rhetoric
Tarez Samra Graban
WMS 221 tgraban@fsu.edu
Th, 3:05-6.05 p.m.

This course offers an historical overview of selected landmarks in the formation of 20th and 21st century rhetorical theory, focusing on available ideas of rhetoric. Our emphasis will be on studying the influences of particular rhetoricians and theorists on their own noetic fields—what James Berlin has called “closed system(s) defining what can, and cannot be known” as well as the nature of the relationship between knower, known, and audiences—and on each other.

Rather than try to recreate the whole history of rhetorical theory in the Western (or even non-Western) tradition(s), we will focus on a few areas of theoretical activity—language, philosophy, multiculturalism, new media, and transnational feminism—reading extensively in the primary treatises and secondary texts that signal contours and shifts in these areas. We will give some attention to classical and neoclassical concepts, but most of our attention will ultimately be given to contemporary traditions that have survived various evolutions from rhetorical modernity to postmodernity. By the end of the course, you will have a comprehensive sense of key critical movements in rhetorical theory, and of how vexing a task it is to chart out a (singular) rhetorical theoretical tradition.

This course is open to students in other tracks and departments.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: Rhetoric and Composition. This course fulfills 3 credit hours of the academic requirement for the Certificate in Editing and Publishing. If a student has already met the academic requirement, the course can count for additional credits toward the 12-hour Certificate.

ENG 5079
Issues in Literary and Cultural Studies
Robin Goodman
WMS 216 rgoodman@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 11:35 a.m.-12:50 p.m.

This is a course about the history of ideas. It asks us to think about the frameworks we use to talk about and analyze literary and cultural texts. It therefore is deeply engaged in understanding the politics of interpretive frameworks. We carefully read texts that were ground-breaking in their day and try to consider what they can offer to our understanding of our own contemporary world and scholarly practices. In the first half of the course, we will read some of the bedrock authors of critical theory, from Marx and Freud to Foucault, Butler, and Adorno. In the second part of the course, we will consider how theory informs current scholarly and social concerns including but not limited to sexuality studies, feminism, the Anthropocene, technology, globalization, and race.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for Gateway Theory course.

ENG 5079
Issues in Literary and Cultural Studies
Barry J. Faulk
WMS 219 bfaulk@fsu.edu
M/W, 4:50-6:05 p.m.

This course holds an unusual place in our curriculum. It exists for its own sake but also to familiarize you with valuable literary critical and theoretical concepts that are useful in all the other classes you take, including your workshop. Literary theory has long been a place in English programs where writing and literacy are considered in their relation to history, power, and identity. The field contains multiple and sometimes contradictory approaches to the study of literature and culture. Learning theory means learning the history of the various and constantly shifting practices within the field, practices that have had real effects in the university and beyond.

This is an incredibly exciting time to be studying literary and cultural theory. That’s partly because the world is currently a dumpster fire: liberal democracies are dead or dying, the environment is literally crashing and burning, and there is a terrifying resurgence of violent racism, sexism, and xenophobia across the globe. A huge chasm exists between the very wealthy and everyone else, a gulf growing wider every day, and made worse by COVID-19. Along with studying foundational texts in the field, we will also read many contemporary theory texts that attempt to analyze our current, ongoing multiple crises and dare to propose solutions. I hope you join me in a collective effort to do some high-stakes, high-level problem-solving!

Required text: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, Third Edition, Leitch et al, editors.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for Gateway Theory course.

ENG 5138
Studies in Film: Adaptation
Christina Parker-Flynn
WMS 441 christina.parker-flynn@fsu.edu
W, 3:05:6:05 p.m.

In this course, we will study classic and contemporary theories of film adaptation, borrowing as well as breaking from the concept of fidelity to create a space to explore how the cinema engages with literature, and how literary stories are deformed and reformed through the medium of film. We will examine a variety of text-to-film adaptations and explore their wider adaptation networks”; some will be more classically defined, such as Robert Siodmak’s adaptation of Hemingway’s The Killers (1964), while others will force us to address adaptation as a concept perhaps equal to influence, as when we study the connectivity between Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope (1948) and Thomas de Quincey’s “On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.” Subsequently, we will also consider how some literature was influenced by film, or adapted itself by “seeing cinematically,” before the cinema even fully evolved. Selected adaptation and film theory will be read, including writings by André Bazin, Roland Barthes, Raymond Bellour, Sergei Eisenstein, Kamilla Elliott, Thomas Leitch, Linda Hutcheon, and Robert Stam.

Films for study may include: Adaptation, Alice in Wonderland, The Big Sleep, Blade Runner, Blade Runner: 2049, Dune, Eyes Wide Shut, The Killers, Nosferatu, Rope, Suspiria (1977 & 2018), Vivre sa Vie.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies; History of Text Technologies (reception conceptual area, Film/TV media); Literature and Film Studies

ENG 5805
Studies in Textual Production: The Book as a Material Object
David L. Gants
WMS 416 dgants@fsu.edu
M, 3:05-6:05 p.m.

Books are eloquent witnesses to their own creation, circulation, and reception. Each leaf bearing inked impressions of long-recycled letterforms and elegant autograph marginalia speaks from the eyes and the hands and the minds of those who made those marks. Watermarks hiding in the fibers of the paper hint at the aesthetic desires of those who twisted wire profiles into miniature icons and sewed them onto the waiting paper mould. Mise en page reveals how the sophisticated mixture of text and paratext interact to create complex layers of meaning. Because it involves careful listening to what an object tells us, this course might also be called The Autobiography of a Book, and it spans textual forms from classical scrolls to electronic publications. The course complements more theoretically and sociologically oriented History of the Book offerings by approaching the book as a physical and/or digital artifact, exploring various methods of bibliographical analysis, and engaging in current scholarly debates.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: History of Text Technologies (production). This class also fulfills 3 credit hours of the academic requirement for the Certificate in Editing and Publishing. If a student has already met the academic requirement, the course can count for additional credits toward the 12-hour Certificate.

ENG 5933
Topics in English: Decadence, Modernity, and Globalization
Robert Stilling
WMS 309 rstilling@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 6:35-7:50 p.m.

Since the nineteenth century, literary “decadence” has long been associated with the end of great periods in history, the decline of nations and empires, with a poetics that turns away from the world, with sexual deviance and moral degeneracy, and an obsession with art for its own sake. Nevertheless, as much recent scholarship has shown, the concept of decadence has expanded to capture the perennial sense of crisis and decline that characterizes modernity right up to our present moment. This course will begin with familiar fin-de-siècle decadents such as Oscar Wilde and J.-K. Huysmans but will quickly move through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries to survey how literary decadence has evolved in the face of empire, decolonization, global migration, secularization, and the global climate crisis. We will read across several genres (fiction, poetry, film) and a range of European, colonial, and postcolonial writers and critics.

Requirements: This course meets the requirements for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies; Colonial, Postcolonial, and Transnational Literary and Cultural Studies. This course also meets the Alterity requirement.

ENG 5933
Topics in English: Ecocriticism and Literature: Books of Nature and the Creaturely World
Molly Hand
WMS 423 mhand@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 1:20-2:35 p.m.

This course will provide students with an understanding of ecocritical theory and animal studies as applied to a variety of texts from early modernity to the present. Our approach will involve several diachronic case studies, in which we will read sets of associated texts through an ecocritical lens. Each set of texts will offer opportunities for historicizing discursive constructions of the non-human as well as for literary critical analysis and reflection on contemporary ecocritical engagements in a variety of texts and media.

With topics ranging from occult knowledge, the environment, and gender, to climate change, animal spectacles, and transspecies transformations, our course readings and discussions will question the contributions of literature both to environmental degradation and to environmental justice, both to alienation from fellow creatures and apathy in the face of planetary crises and to interspecies collaborations and transspecies becomings. Students will develop a strong foundation in ecocriticism and animal studies which might then inform their teaching and research. In addition to regular short response essays and a presentation, students will produce a piece of original scholarship which may be presented as a conference paper or developed into a publishable article.

Our critical lexicon will be informed by selections from, for example, Donna Haraway, Ursula Heise, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Anna Tsing, Laurie Shannon, Erica Fudge, John Berger, and others. Primary texts may include, for example, medieval bestiaries, early modern natural histories, a variety of emblems, plays such as Shakespeare’s The Tempest and The Winter’s Tale, essays by Bacon and Montaigne, Beckett’s Endgame, Kang’s The Vegetarian, and Schweblin’s Fever Dream.

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for either one course pre-1660 or one course pre-1800. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Medieval and Early-Modern British Literary and Cultural Studies.

ENG 5933
Topics in English: Second Modernism: Multimedia Moderns and the Afterlives of Modernity
Aaron Jaffe
WMS 429 ajaffe@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 4:50-6:05 p.m.

This course offers a graduate seminar on modernist literature and culture in the context of the radically altered media background of modernity. What is or was modernism? What is the relation between modernism, the avant-garde, postmodernism, and the contemporary? What does media history have to do with modernist aesthetics? What does literary modernism have to do with literary history? What’s new modernist studies? It sounds redundant. Or, insecure. Make it new, again? This class will pursue the idea that new modernist studies is less about new interpretations of old texts—less even, new texts to interpret—and more about a second modernism: new scholarly attitude, new interpretive horizons, new archives and new contexts. There remain two pressing needs for new modernist studies that we will pursue in this course: first, to theorize the conditions of possibility for this kind of work, and, second, to look back to the modern writers and thinkers who showed us—and can still show us—how.

Requirements: This course meets the requirements for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies; Literary and Cultural Theory.

ENG 5933
Topics in English: Nineteenth-Century Rhetorics of Black Citizenship
Kristie Fleckenstein
WMS 224 kfleckenstein@fsu.edu
Tu/Thu, 11.35 a.m.-12.50 p.m.

In an eerie foreshadowing of the current political moment, The Independent Monitor, a weekly Alabama newspaper, solicited subscribers for what they touted in 1869 as “the white’s man’s newspaper.” Articulating an overt white supremacist agenda, they descried cruelty to the “negro” while at the same time adamantly opposing equality with these “descendants of Ham” through any and all means.,/p>

Heeding George Santayana’s aphoristic warning that “those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat,” this course focuses on the past moment evoked by The Independent Monitor to discern potential ways forward in the current moment. More specifically, the course investigates the rhetorical battle waged by nineteenth-century African American activists to obtain and retain civic and civil rights by advocating for and performing citizenship.

We begin with overview of Black nineteenth-century rhetoric, aligning it with the complicated history of U.S. citizenship. We then explore Black rhetoric in three moments W. E. B. Du Bois identifies as significant in the struggle for Black civil rights: 1800-1850, examining the rhetoric of colonization; 1850-1865, addressing a rhetoric of Black civic virtue; and 1884-1900, analyzing the rhetoric of the “New Negro.” Throughout, we trace specific rhetorical performances of Black citizenship, identifying rhetors’ use of available means of persuasion, their invention of new means of persuasion, and their creative appropriation of such emerging technologies as photography.

Grades will be based on two major projects, six short response papers, and participation appropriate for a graduate seminar.

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course in 1660-1900. It also satisfies the requirements for coursework in one of the following Areas of Concentration: American Literary and Cultural Studies to 1900; Literary Genre (Nonfiction). This course also meets the Alterity requirement.

ENG 5933
Topics in English: Creativity, in Theory: Remixing Your Archive
S.E. Gontarski
WMS 430 sgontarski@fsu.edu
Tu/Th, 4:50-6:05 p.m.

“Never trust the artist. Trust the tale. The proper function of a critic is to save the tale from the artist who created it.” D.H. Lawrence

“As soon as there is interpretation, there is shit.” Gilles Deleuze

“Truth is not to be found in meaning, sense, summary, or translation. It is through creativity, invention, trial, and inevitably error that radical work is done, and Deleuze’s catalog of concepts preserves a lifetime of failures instructive to our moment—not as a bible, but merely one more author to be taken from behind.” Andrew Marzoni, The Nation

In addition to unpacking the above snippets, we ask and will examine: What constitutes creativity? What are its sources? How do we recognize or generate it? Is it good, prima facie? Is it the core of our professional and social desire? Can it be learned or summoned? On demand, or request? What does it mean to be a creative thinker? A creative reader? (Hear William Burroughs tackle the issue.) A creative writer? When Alan Pryce-Jones says in the TLS, “Beckett is one of the rare creative minds in our times” —what does that mean?

Henri Bergson saw creativity as part of the evolutionary process in Creative Evolution and The Creative Mind. That is, Darwin does not seem to account for the development of creativity (or consciousness, for that matter); Bergson does (both), at least theoretically.

Creative Evolution is an extrapolation of the mind-matter duality of Matter and Memory. It opposes not individual mind, but “life,” to the downward drift of a partly reconceived matter. Life, Bergson argues, is a tendency towards increasing flexibility, organization, consciousness. Matter, inversely, is a drift towards dispersion, loss of form, degradation of potential energy. The tension between matter and life results in the endlessly renewed creativity of life, vectored not towards a single preestablished goal [something universal like truth, say] but towards a multiple branching of diverse forms [what Deleuze will call multiplicity].

“In Deleuze’s view, then, philosophy more closely resembles practical or artistic production than it does an adjunct to a definitive scientific description of a pre-existing world (as in the tradition of Locke or Quine) [. . . .] Deleuze does not treat cinema [for instance] as an art representing an external reality, but as an ontological practice that creates different ways of organizing movement and time. Philosophy, science, and art are equally, and essentially, creative and practical. Hence, instead of asking traditional questions of identity such as “is it true?” or “what is it?,” Deleuze proposes that inquiries should be functional or practical: “what does it do?” or “how does it work?”

So we ask, “What is a creative act?” But we must immediately add, where do we look to find answers? For one, we can listen to Deleuze from 1987 at La Femis.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Theory.

ENL 5236
Studies in Restoration/18th Century British Literature: Rebellion, Slavery, and Abolition in the British Atlantic
Candace Ward
WMS 220 candace.ward@fsu.edu
W, 3:05-6:05 p.m.

In 1807 Britain’s parliament passed the Act To Abolish the Slave Trade; in 1833, the Emancipation Act was passed, effective August 1834 with the implementation of the Apprenticeship period, followed in 1838 with “full freedom.” In this course, we will examine what Ian Baucom in Specters of the Atlantic describes as the “piling up” of history, contextualizing the events that shaped the “fatal Atlantic beginning of the modern”—Caribbean slavery—and leading up to these landmark legislations. The discourses of rebellion, slavery, and abolition that provide this context cross generic and chronological lines: our enquiries begin in the Restoration period, with Henry Neville’s “porno-topia,” The Isle of Pines (1668) and Aphra Behn’s novella recounting the story of the rebellious slave Oroonoko; moving into the eighteenth century, we’ll not only encounter proplanter georgic poetry like James Grainger’s four-book The Sugar-Cane and ameliorist novels like William Earle’s Obi but also planter-historian Edward Long’s description of Tacky’s Revolt in his History of Jamaica. These reports, along with slave narratives by Olaudah Equiano and Mary Prince, oral histories from Jamaica’s Maroon communities, and Marlon James’s historical novel Book of Night Women, bring alive what Caribbean historian Hilary Beckles calls “one protracted struggle launched by Africans and their Afro-West Indian progeny against slave owners”—a struggle that spanned more than three centuries.

As we explore the complexities and contradictions embedded in these narratives, we will also work to avoid the “facile normalization of the present” (David Scott, Conscripts of Modernity). In other words, we will refuse to essentialize differences between “us” and the historical “them” of our enquiry and look to these texts for our “now.”

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course in 1660-1900. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: Colonial, Postcolonial, and Transnational Literary and Cultural Studies; British and Irish Literary and Cultural Studies, 1660-1900. The course also meets the Alterity requirement.

ENL 5246
Studies in British Romantic Literature: Methodologies
Judith Pascoe
WMS 421 jpascoe@fsu.edu

This course will introduce students to the long Romantic period (1750 to 1850), with an emphasis on recent methodological innovations. Reading assignments will cover a generous selection of poetry (including poems by Wordsworth, Byron, Keats, Robinson, Smith, and Barbauld), fiction and drama (in particular, novels and plays by Inchbald, Austen, and Brontë), and critical/theoretical texts that have shaped our understanding of the field. We will especially focus on how Romantic-era writers moved (imaginatively and literally) beyond their national boundaries in such works as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Mary Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, and Olaudeh Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative.

Students will read from new monographs in the areas of postcolonial studies, book studies, and computational analysis, and will meet via Zoom with the authors of these works. Students will also be encouraged to define their own research methodologies, and to envision how their research skills prepare them for a variety of professional careers. To inspire these thoughtful endeavors, we will meet with the creators of two mold-breaking dissertations.

Students from all departments and disciplinary groups are welcome.

Requirements: This course fulfills the general literature requirement for one course 1660-1900. It also satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Area of Concentration: British and Irish Literary and Cultural Studies 1660-1900.

LIT 5047
Studies in Drama: American Drama after 1960: Performing the Hyphen
Carla Della Gatta
WMS 436 cdellagatta@fsu.edu
M, 6:35-9:35 p.m.

The last sixty years saw various civil rights movements, feminist movements, LGBTQ rights advocacy, and a reevaluation and reassertion of group identity constructs. American drama implicitly and explicitly showcases the performance of various hyphenated identities and the intersections of them: ethnic, racial, gender, sexuality, religious, and regional. This course will address how hyphenated identities are dramatized, issues of the performativity of race and gender, and implications of genre on the performance of culture.

Primary texts are American dramas from the playwrights listed below, and secondary readings are from a breadth of methodological lenses such as critical race and ethnicity theory, performance theory, and gender and sexuality theory. This class will also include a unit on the reading and teaching of dramatic literature in various academic contexts.

Primary texts include plays by the following: Ayad Akhtar, Edward Albee, Migdalia Cruz, Maria Irene Fornés, Quiara Alegría Hudes, David Henry Hwang, Tony Kushner, Tarrell Alvin McCraney, Suzan-Lori Parks, Sarah Ruhl, Luis Valdez, Paula Vogel, August Wilson

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies; Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; A Literary Genre (Drama). The course also meets the Alterity requirement

LIT 5309
Studies in Popular Culture: Gender, Race, and Television
Leigh Edwards
WMS 439 ledwards@fsu.edu
Tu/Th 1:20-2:35 p.m.

This course examines how gender and race are represented on television. Drawing on feminist theory, gender studies, and critical race theory as well as work in television studies, the course focuses on gender and race as issues in representation but also as categories in the political economy and structure of the television industry. We will pay particular attention to intersectionality theory, including gender and race in reference to other relevant categories such as class, sexuality, and disability. In addition, we will attend to media convergence as a key context in which to understand television’s ever-increasing use of new media and transmedia storytelling.

One of our key topics will be projections of authenticity on television in reference to gender and race and how that socially constructed idea of believability is only becoming more complex in our digital era of easily manipulated images. We will also consider: gender and genre, including how new discourse about cultural legitimation and television reinscribes gendered categories and taste hierarchies; the politics of race and respectability, as some television narratives work to challenge older discourses of respectability; new work on the evolution of the star image, the performed self, and the self as brand; and how gender and race impact audiences and fandom, as well as television formats and global flows. We will discuss vital issues in television studies and media history, such as the post-network era and streaming context. Our focus will be on U.S. culture, but we will study questions of globalization and use transnational critical frameworks.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Post-1900 Literary and Cultural Studies; Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; the History of Text Technologies (reception conceptual area, TV media). This course also meets the Alterity requirement. It fulfills 3 credit hours of the academic requirement for the Certificate in Editing and Publishing. If a student has already met the academic requirement, the course can count for additional credits toward the 12-hour Certificate.

LIT 5388
Studies in Women’s Writing: Feminism and Travel
Celia R. Caputi
WMS 422 celia.caputi@fsu.edu
TuTh, 1:20-2:35 p.m.

“‘…As a woman, I have no country. As a woman, I want no country. As a woman, my country is the whole world.’” --Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas

This course is premised on the notion of travel and mobility as feminist issues. From Chaucer's Wife of Bath onward, women who “get around” have been viewed with fascination and loathing by masculinist-xenophobic ideologues, and female mobility (when not enforced by what Gayle Rubin famously terms “the traffic in women”) has been stigmatized, eroticized, exoticized, and demonized. At the same time, having the means to travel—and the intellectual and spiritual freedom travel proffers—can be celebrated as marks of an individual woman's empowerment within a given culture. In this course we will explore tropes of mobility and journey-narratives in literature by women from a number of theoretical perspectives. Here are highlights from a tentative reading list: Mary Wollstonecraft’s travel letters, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Virginia Woolf’s The Voyage Out and Orlando; Hélène Cixous and Catherine Clément’s The Newly Born Woman; Toni Morrison’s Beloved; Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel, Persepolis; Cheryl Strayed's Wild.

Requirements: This course satisfies the requirement for coursework in the following Areas of Concentration: Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. The course also meets the Alterity requirement.